Vulnerable Populations

This section focuses on specific segments of Ohio's population that are at particular risk for housing challenges or housing insecurity. These include Ohio's veterans, people with disabilities, infants, youth transition out of foster care and victims of domestic violence.


Section Highlights:

  • Nearly two-thirds of homes in Ohio (63%) cannot be entered by someone in a wheelchair; a higher rate of inaccessibility than the national average (56%).
  • Ohio is experiencing a dramatic increase in drug overdose deaths involving opiates. 2017 saw a 20% increase in such deaths from 2016, or a 560% increase over the past decade.
  • Seven out of every 1,000 children born in Ohio in 2016 died before their first birthday, the 8th highest rate in the United States.
  • Children born to black mothers were three times more likely to die before their first birthday than those born to white mothers (15.8 and 5.2 deaths per 1,000 live births, respectively).
  • Over a third (36%) of 21-year-olds transitioning out of foster care in Ohio reported experiencing homelessness in the prior two years, considerably higher likelihood than the national average (28%).

Jump to: Maps | Visualizations | Tables & Reports | Notes | Sources


County Maps

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Disability Prevalance Rate

Source: 2013–2017 American Community Survey (ACS) Five Year Estimates, Table B18101

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Unintentional Opiate Overdose Mortality Rate

Source: Ohio Public Health Data Warehouse, Ohio Department of Health (based on 2017 data)

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Infant Mortality Rate

Source: Ohio Public Health Data Warehouse, Ohio Department of Health (based on cumulative data from 2007 to 2017)


Data Visualizations

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Wheelchair Inaccessibility for Ohio & Comparison States

Source: 2015 American Housing Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Housing Problems for Renter Households With a Disabled Person

Source: 2011–2015 Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy Data, Table 6

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Unintentional Opiate Overdose Mortality Rate

Source: Ohio Public Health Data Warehouse, Ohio Department of Health

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Infant Mortality Rate By Race of the Mother

Source: Ohio Infant Mortality Data, Ohio Department of Health

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Infant Mortality Rates for Ohio & Neighboring States

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (based on 2017 data)

Please be advised that the following maps and data visualizations are provided for informational purposes only. Load times will vary depending on your internet connection speed. To download the data for a specific map or data visualization, first click in the white space of the graphic, click the "Download" button below and then click "Data" in the menu that pops up. You may also access most of the data through the downloadable tables in Excel posted lower down on the page.

Transition Age Youth Homelessness in Ohio & Neighboring States

Source: 2011–2015 National Youth in Transition Database Youth Outcomes Report, Children's Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


Downloadable Tables

Related Reports


Notes

People with disabilities include any civilian noninstitutionalized person with a hearing, vision, cognitive, ambulatory, self-care or independent living difficulty.

Housing units can be entered by someone in a wheelchair if it is possible to enter from outside without climbing any steps or stairs.

A "housing problem" indicates a household where housing costs exceed 30 percent of income, a housing unit has incomplete kitchen or plumbing facilities, or more than one occupant per room. AMI refers to area median income as defined by HUD. Individuals can be categorized as having more than one type of disability.

Opiates, or opioids, include the illegal drug heroin, synthetic drugs such as fentanyl and pain medications available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine and morphine. The mortality rate is the number of deaths per 100,000 population, adjusted for age.

The infant mortality rate is the number of infant deaths (before the first birthday) per 1,000 live births in the year prior.

Transition age youth are young people between 16 and 24 years who are in transition from state custody or foster care. Based on a five year cohort. At 17 years of age, respondents reported any experience of homelessness in their lifetime, while 19- and 21-year-old respondents reported experience of homelessness in the past two year. Homelessness is defined as having no regular or adequate place to live.


Data Sources